Alyosha Moeran

“I remember reading a story as a kid in Japan… it was from the folktales of “Oita”, the region in which I was brought up and the story was about a a guy, a priest, who decided to carve a passage through a mountain because travellers kept falling to their deaths from the treacherous path which ran along the cliff edge. i think it took him over twenty years. I remember being hugely impressed with the idea that one person could even think to carve through a mountain. i later visited the passageway where the marks of his chisels could still be seen…

Stone carving requires a huge amount of persistence and determination but once you get to grips with the material , it can be surprisingly flexible and the work itself is strangely meditative. The process of carving stone is like a kind of active dreaming. The material has a density, an unforgiving nature and sense of permanence but the work I do is more about trying to convey an idea of transformation, of fragility and lightness.

I studied History as an undergraduate at Cambridge before starting work in stone in 1992. I first trained in stonemasonry at the Building craft college and later architectural stone carving at the City and Guilds London School of Art in 1996. I have been carving stone ever since. I have always felt that good, dynamic stonework is based on a balance of technique and design. I draw my inspiration from the tradition of the craft and seek to apply it to a modern, built environment. The work I do is varied, ranging from Sculpture, lettercarving, fire-surrounds and Public Art.”

Alyosha Moeran